Gary Condit | Biography 2021
Gary Condit | Biography 2021

Quick Information

  • Full Name Gary Adrian Condit
  • Occupation Politician
  • Nationality American
  • Birthplace Woodland Junction, Salina, Oklahoma
  • Born Year And Birthday Apr 21, 1948
  • Age 73 Years, 1 Months
Former Member of California Assembly

Gary Condit | Biography 2021

Former Member of California Assembly

In 1972, Gary Condit did not consider politics as a career choice. For starters, he was just 23 years old and still a senior at Stanislaus State. Besides, he wasn't a very good joiner. He was pleasant but not particularly gregarious, and he and Carolyn had just been in town for four years. Also, he'd never been a part of a political campaign.


Quick Information
  • Full Name Gary Adrian Condit
  • Occupation Politician
  • Nationality American
  • Birthplace Woodland Junction, Salina, Oklahoma
  • Profession Former Member of California Assembly
  • Birth Date Apr 21, 1948
  • Age 73 Years, 1 Months

Gary Adrian Condit is an American politician who served in the House of Representatives from 1989 to 2003, representing California’s 18th congressional district.

Is Gary Condit Still a Congressman?

Gary Adrian Condit is a former US congressman who served in the House of Representatives from 1989 to 2003, representing California’s 18th congressional district. Later, his adulterous romance with Chandra Levy, a Federal Bureau of Prisons intern, got publicized after Levy went missing in May 2001, and her remains were discovered a year later.

Although Condit was never legally charged in Levy’s disappearance and murder, the issue cost him the Democratic primary in 2002.

Early Life and Family

Gary A. Condit was born to Jean and the Rev. Adrian Condit on 21 April 1948, in Woodland Junction, Oklahoma, near a town called Salina. Condit’s father preached to the town’s Baptist congregation at Little Rock Church, which the family considered a second home. The Condits, including Gary’s two brothers and sister, attended church four times a week.

When Gary was 14, Condit’s family relocated to Tulsa, a location that provided his father with greater prospects, as his father was a preacher. The family resided next door to the church where he preached in Tulsa. Condit went to Nathan Hale High School. 

Gary worked as an oil field roustabout for a summer at an early age, earning enough money to buy a 1964 Chevy Impala that got him into trouble. According to Chicago Tribune, court documents show that a “Gary Adrian Condit” was ticketed three times in Tulsa in one year: once for speeding through town, once for running a stop sign, and once for driving without a license. He failed to appear in court in each case, prompting officials to issue an arrest order.

Marriage and Further Education

Condit met Carolyn Berry, a blond pep girl who had a toothy grin and wore cardigans, at his high school (Nathan Hale High). They eventually started dating, and she got pregnant during their final year. 

Later, the young couple traveled to the fringes of Oklahoma, across old Cherokee land, to marry in a county where tying the knot required only 15 minutes and a blood test. To get married in Oklahoma at the time, males had to be 21 years old, and females had to be 18 years old. According to records, Condit fudged his age on the form by seven years instead of three, indicating that he was 25.

Their son, Chad, was born that summer, and they relocated to Ceres, California, to join Rev. At that time Condit, was already preaching at a Baptist church. Gary had been canning tomatoes and selling paint at a Montgomery Ward store before running for the local office. He hadn’t even graduated from Cal State Stanislaus when he decided to run.

In 1972, Condit graduated from nearby California State University in Stanislaus with a bachelor’s degree.

Ceres City Council

In 1972, Gary Condit did not consider politics as a career choice. For starters, he was just 23 years old and still a senior at Stanislaus State. Adding to that, he’d never been a part of a political campaign. He was pleasant but not particularly gregarious. He and Carolyn had just been in town for four years.

But after one encounter with a gentleman whose son was serving in Vietnam, Condit decided to run for city council and make a positive difference, “I worked at Norris Industries making mortar shells for the Vietnam War,” he continued; “I’d go to school from 8:00 in the morning to 1:00 or 2:00 in the afternoon and get to work at 3:00. Initially, I didn’t think much about it, but because I was married and we had a child my classification for the military was different. I drove to work with an older gentleman whose son was in Vietnam.” He added, “At one point during a contract negotiation, it looked like they were going to lay people off. This gentleman said, ‘Oh God, I’m going to hate it if I lose this job.’ I called him Stringbean. I said, ‘Stringbean, you have a son in Vietnam. You should be happy if we lose our jobs and he gets home safe.’”

Following the conversation, Condit recognized that, while people’s need for work was vital, the most important thing was that the war ended. After that conversation, he felt compelled to do something to demonstrate that young to could make a positive difference. Even though he had never attended a city council meeting before being sworn in, he eventually chose to run for city council.

For a seat on the Ceres City Council, 1,300 votes were needed. He won the vote. From 1972 to 1976, Condit served in the Ceres city council, the final two of which he served as mayor. At the age of 25, he was elected the city’s youngest mayor in history.

California Assembly

By the time he was 35, the young politician had risen quickly through the ranks of the Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors and the California Assembly.

Eventually, Condit and Calderon formed the “Gang of Five” with three other centrist Democrats (Steve Peace, Charles Calderon, Rusty Areias, and Jerry Eaves) in the mid-1980s. Four of the group members, including Condit, were in their late twenties to early thirties. The group rose to prominence by publicly challenging the Assembly’s powerful speaker, Willie Brown, and attempting to steer policies in a more centrist direction. In their attempt to depose Brown, the group, however, turned unsuccessful. As a result, members were stripped of leadership roles, committee assignments, and other benefits.

Condit’s power and influence, on the other hand, extended beyond the Assembly’s walls. Although he and the group failed in the Democratic leadership in Sacramento, he was seen as courageous and honorable back home.

In 1989, Condit ran for Congress in a special election, seizing the opportunity. Rep. Tony Coelho, the incumbent, resigned over a financial controversy, and Condit was elected to replace him.

Making connections in Washington as a conservative Democrat, Condit founded the Blue Dog Coalition, a group of more than 20 Democrats who frequently support Republican-sponsored legislation across party lines.

From 1989 to 1992, he served as a Democrat in the California 15th congressional district.

Condit became the representative for California’s 18th congressional district a year later and served as a Democrat from 1993 to 2002.